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Credit score gibberish, state of New York #n511

#HelloNewYork! Revamp for the Department of Financial Services. Copy-and-paste. Easy-breezy. #DotGov

| By Greg Fisher

From: Greg Fisher [mailto:greg@truthandfalsity.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2015 11:07 AM
To: Matt Anderson, Department of Financial Services, state of New York
Subject: Credit score, state of New York, gibberish #n511

See this message and your response at [link to this page] .

I left a message.

With my apologies for this interruption, I would like you to read the information behind the link above. I took the liberty of suggesting a correction to New York's citizens' website, specifically http://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/creditreport.htm . Alone, theoretically, it affects the people of only one of the states of the United States. But the sum of a thousand such errors creates a substantial problem!

In this case, it appears that the list of "five categories" (also called the "5 FICO Score Ingredients")(both by the namesake) was flubbed because of a formatting error. That list is a trope used as filler by writers when creating a typical article about credit scores. They could just link to the information published by the keeper of the secrets, but that wouldn't be good make-work. On the other hand, we don't know how long it would be until link rot sets in.

I checked the page in the state of New York domain in several internet web browsers (and multiple mobile devices, of course! (Ah! This RWD is all the rage)) and reproduced the same result in every case. But the truth (about form-as opposed to function, at least) lies in the HTML source code structure. So, I pulled it directly from your page and put it on mine.

As a test of my veracity, try to answer this question: Why does the puny "Length of Credit History" (15%) have its own boldface heading when Payment History (35%)(!) does not?

In a more general sense, I believe that that page is just the result of the silly idea of producing so-called 'content' with truth as only secondary notion. But, I would be shirking my civic duty to not ask the State of New York Who wrote it? Or, should we just let the mystery stand, and chalk it up to the unfortunate effort of a summer intern?

Whatever its origin, it is history. There is enough blame to go around. Onward and upward and all that.

Again, please forgive me for barging in. Do you agree that there is an error?

--
Greg Fisher
Truth and Falsity
truthandfalsity.com
Page A2
pagea2.com
The Credit Scoring Site
creditscoring.com
PO Box 342
Dayton, Ohio 45409-0342
skype fisher100
937-681-3224




Suggested change for the citizens of New York

This is how it stands.

-- CODE FROM STATE OF NEW YORK WEBSITE STARTS IMMEDIATELY AFTER THIS LINE OF RED TEXT--

What does a FICO score take into consideration?

Your FICO score only looks at information in your credit report and considers both the positive and the negative information on the report including:

Length of Credit History – (accounts for about 15%)

How Does the FICO Score Count Inquiries?

-- CODE FROM STATE OF NEW YORK WEBSITE ENDED IMMEDIATELY ABOVE THIS LINE OF RED TEXT--

This is better.

What does a FICO score take into consideration?

Your FICO score only looks at information in your credit report and considers both the positive and the negative information on the report including:

  1. Payment History – (accounts for about 35%)

    • On-time payments on...

  2. The Amounts You Owe – (about 30%)

    • The total amount...

  3. Length of Credit History – (about 15%)

    • The age of...

  4. New Credit – (about 10%)

    • How many new...

  5. Types of Credit in Use – (about 10%).

    • What kinds of...

For those using devices larger than 5 inches, open these in additional separate windows and arrange them side-by-side. Compare the states's document (unfortunate) to http://www.scoreinfo.org/ov... (horse's mouth), and to http://free.creditscore.org/wh... (unfortunate).

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